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Familosophy

Can Money Buy Happiness? blog by David Werdiger

Can Money Buy Happiness?

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And does being ‘happy’ mean something different to those who have wealth and those who don’t? These are the questions considered in a recent research study. Most anyone who has wealth would find it obvious that the answer to the first question is a resounding ‘no’, but it takes the rigour of an academic to first define happiness (life satisfaction and a set of distinct positive emotions), and then examine the correlation between them and…

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How Do Subsequent Generations In Your Family ‘Prove Themselves’?

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Consider this from two perspectives: the family and the individual. Do families demand that younger generations prove themselves in some way, perhaps before being allowed to join the family business or take some other role with respect to the family assets? The other side is the view of the younger family member. Being born into wealth can be a lodestone, especially the way ‘privilege’ is a dirty word in some circles. The world loves a…

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The downside to wealth

The Downside to Wealth

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This is a difficult topic to broach, and needs to be done only in appropriate settings – indeed, that might be the most important message of this topic. After the story of BMW heiress Susanne Klatten went public, she was slammed on social media. Her personal challenges – the responsibility, self-doubt, and being targeted by scammers – are real. But it’s very hard for anyone brought up without wealth to have any sympathy (and often it’s the reverse), so seeking it from ‘outsiders’ is almost a waste of time.

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Conflict Resolution in Wealthy Families

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Conflict resolution is always difficult, even more if it is between families. David writes for Opalesque about family conflict resolution, especially in wealthy families. He discusses the conflict resolution model based on Harvard’s ‘Getting to Yes‘ negotiation theory. He explains the powers-rights-interests framework detailed with a case study that makes for easy understanding of a complex topic.

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Three Family Lessons from Greenleaf

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A powerful and prominent family, and the religious institution they run. That was more than enough to pique my interest, and after rapidly working our way through three seasons of the outstanding Netflix series Greenleaf, it reinforced so much I already know about family business, succession, and intergenerational transition. When telling people about this series, I delay mentioning the setting – a African-American mega-church in Memphis. While that aspect adds a wonderful dimension, the intersecting…

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Greed or Envy?

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Greed and Envy are two of the ‘seven deadly sins’ and are relevant to material wealth. Economists adopt the fundamental principle that people seek wealth maximisation (a form of greed), but is this really the case? Because we live in communities and families, it can be argued that the more significant driver of behaviour is envy, because we invariably compare and benchmark ourselves to those around us. For the economists among you, the analysis is…

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How Do You Pass Your Business To The Next Generation?

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According to Australian research, family businesses are ill prepared for succession planning, appointing a new CEO, or even a strategy for the future of the business. The first consideration is whether anyone in the family even wants to take over the business – plenty of children have no interest. Then, decide if the current owner(s) want to hand it over. Any successful transition needs both of those things at the outset. It might be better…

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Can Money Buy Happiness?

By | Familosophy | No Comments

And does being ‘happy’ mean something different to those who have wealth and those who don’t? These are the questions considered in a recent research study. Most anyone who has wealth would find it obvious that the answer to the first question is a resounding ‘no’, but it takes the rigour of an academic to first define happiness (life satisfaction and a set of distinct positive emotions), and then examine the correlation between them and…

Read More