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Familosophy

David’s Familosophy newsletter

At What Age Should Someone Inherit?

By Articles, Familosophy, LinkedIn, original No Comments

Increasing life expectancies have meant that for the first time in history, four generations are alive at the same time. This has important implications for the timing of the transition of family wealth. There is an ‘inheritance boom’ coming when the Millennial generation inherit the wealth of the Baby Boomer generation, but this is expected to peak in 2035 when the average Millennial has already passed the age of 60! Some wealth originators shudder at…

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Greed or Envy?

By Familosophy, original No Comments

Greed and Envy are two of the ‘seven deadly sins’ and are relevant to material wealth. Economists adopt the fundamental principle that people seek wealth maximisation (a form of greed), but is this really the case? Because we live in communities and families, it can be argued that the more significant driver of behaviour is envy, because we invariably compare and benchmark ourselves to those around us. For the economists among you, the analysis is…

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How Do You Pass Your Business To The Next Generation?

By Articles, Familosophy, LinkedIn, original No Comments

According to Australian research, family businesses are ill prepared for succession planning, appointing a new CEO, or even a strategy for the future of the business. The first consideration is whether anyone in the family even wants to take over the business – plenty of children have no interest. Then, decide if the current owner(s) want to hand it over. Any successful transition needs both of those things at the outset. It might be better…

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Can Money Buy Happiness?

By Familosophy, original No Comments

And does being ‘happy’ mean something different to those who have wealth and those who don’t? These are the questions considered in a recent research study. Most anyone who has wealth would find it obvious that the answer to the first question is a resounding ‘no’, but it takes the rigour of an academic to first define happiness (life satisfaction and a set of distinct positive emotions), and then examine the correlation between them and…

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